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★★★★☆

“In 'The Gunslinger', Stephen King introduces readers...”

Written on: 08/08/2006 by Dreadlocksmile (358 reviews written)

Good Points
It sets the scene well for the rest of the Dark Tower series. The introduction to the characters and their characterization throughout the novel is fantastic, making the novel a very enjoyable read.

Bad Points
A little slow paced at times. The novel is also rather short compared to the rest of the 'Dark Tower' series.

General Comments
In 'The Gunslinger', Stephen King introduces readers to one of his most enigmatic heroes, Roland of Gilead, the Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting figure, a loner, on a spellbinding journey into good and evil, in a desolate world which frighteningly echoes our own. In his first step towards the powerful and mysterious Dark Tower, Roland encounters an alluring woman named Alice, begins a friendship with Jake, a kid from New York, and faces an agonising choice between damnation and salvation as he pursues the Man in Black.



'The Gunslinger' is the first instalment from Stephen King's fantasy epic series 'The Dark Tower'. Written over a period of almost 30 years, over seven books, spanning a total of 3712 pages, this really is an epic saga.



This is the shortest book of the series, lasting for a mere 238 pages. The book introduces the reader to Roland (the Gunslinger) whose journey to reach the dark tower is first set in motion.



The novel builds up slowly, allowing the reader to become accustomed to King's Dark Tower world. Characterization takes on an important role throughout the novel, getting the reader to know and feel for Roland and the few other characters that appear in the pages. With the journey the reader is taken on through the seven books, this first novel does the task of setting the scene and introducing the complex and original character of Roland perfectly. The book is often described as the prologue to the series, which seems a suitable comment to make.



As a stand alone novel, 'The Gunslinger' is a rather slow and laborious novel, that gradually builds to the next platform of the saga. But the book is an important introduction to this gripping epic, giving you a good entrance to the series.



The new and revised version of this book includes the story having been expanded and revised along with a sixteen page Introduction and Forward, as well as a 28 page excerpt from the beginning of the second book in the series 'The Drawing Of The Three'.

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