Chalmers Johnson, The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, & the End of the Republic Review

Click here if this is your business
★★★★★
4.5 / 5
From 1 review
100% of users recommend this
Click here if this is your business
  • Value For Money

Harriet Klausner's review of Chalmers Johnson, The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic

★★★★★
Chalmers Johnson, The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic

“The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the...”

Written on: 23/12/2003 by Harriet Klausner (18660 reviews written)

The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic

Chalmers Johnson

Metropolitan, 2004, $25.00, 387 pp.

ISBN: 0805070044



Before 9/11 in BLOWBACK, Chalmers Johnson anticipated dire consequences and negative active reactions to the American U.S. foreign policy that has run roughshod over much of the world, but especially Asia. In his latest cautionary book, Mr. Johnson pulls no punches as he accuses the Bush crowd of global militarism using a "private army" of Special Forces to keep the American colonies "in line". Referring to Presidents like Eisenhower, Mr. Johnson makes the case that the military-industrial complex has already happened, but is really a federal government-industrial complex. He insists that the State Department, EPA, and Interior, etc. have been silenced by the war machine and the oil magnates. "Pre-emptive intervention" is just a fake way of covering the administration's belief that the USA is the New Rome."



Though he takes the clever Clinton to task as a disguised imperialist, Mr. Johnson spends much of his criticism on Bush bashing. The author insists that the "boy emperor" and his merry men (and a few women) are destroying the nation with their illusions of grandeur policies. This segment of THE SORROWS OF EMPIRE is the strength of the book as Mr. Johnson lays out powerful evidence with astounding and absorbing details of outlandish defense overkill with related scenarios and incredible spending that Everett Dirksen could not imagine. However, the book lacks substance on what can be done besides booting out the current Congress perhaps because the author feels we have crossed the Potomac. Still the case for American imperialism endangering the future of this country is strongly made.



Harriet Klausner

  • Value For Money

If you are commenting on behalf of the company that has been reviewed, please consider upgrading to Official Business Response for higher impact replies.
Report this review