Ecoflow Bioflow Review

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Janner48's review of Ecoflow Bioflow

★★★★★
Ecoflow Bioflow

“I use a black Bioflow wristband which is a bit like a...”

Written on: 14/11/2004 by Janner48 (1 review written)

Good Points
No pills or potions, attractive to wear and lots of styles to chose from, last for a long time, if it works for you it's a friend for life. 90 day period during which you can return it if not satisfied and get your money back (less 15% handling charge). Quality is very good.

Bad Points
Should not be worn by people using heart pacemakers or other implant that can be affected by magnetic fields.

Don't work for everyone - nobody knows why.

General Comments
I use a black Bioflow wristband which is a bit like a watch to look at. Quality is very good and there are lots of designs and colours to suit all ages and tastes, some are in the form of fashion jewelry.



Mine has definitely helped reduce my aches and pains and it's definitely not in the mind! Also a friend with arthritis tried one (borrowed to try) and started getting relief within a few hours - she bought one the next day and has a more comfortable life since; in fact she has bought a Bioflow dog collar for her old dog who is a bit stiff in the joints.



I have met several other users who are very positive about the results. It seems that they work better for some than others and take longer to show an effect on some people - but, that's life I guess.



One thing I am sure about - magnotherapy does work.

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Davidinnotts's Response to Janner48's Review

Written on: 13/11/2005

A note about pacemakers and magnetic bracelets:
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<br>Older pacemakers are sensitive to magnets because magnetism is used to make the pacemaker's settings. So the consultant will naturally advise you to keep away from magnets as a precaution, because accidentally putting a strongish magnet against your chest over the pacemaker could change the settings. However, the magnet WOULD have to be fairly strong to affect the pacemaker.
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<br>Consultants are wisely cautious - you'd want them to be! So the basic advice is still to avoid any magnets getting close to the pacemaker. This can lead to you being told to have nothing magnetic on your person or in the house if you can avoid it. I think they go on the principle that most people can't easily judge whether an magnet is strong enough to be dangerous - a fair point. So fridge magnets, electric mixers, any loudspeaker or telephone might be banned because they contain magnets. Yes, some have gone this far!
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<br>Hospitals are now very much into risk assessment, ie, is the effect on your life of taking a small or large risk worth the benefits. Training in this is now spreading right across the health service. However, this needs careful assessment and a judgement, which takes time, consultation of the patient and a written record.
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<br>Many consultants are busy, they're maybe trained only the old way and only seeing things from their own speciality's viewpoint. They might say, "I can't advise you to take the slightest risk, even a vanishingly small risk, whatever the effect on your quality of life in other ways." They really mean, "I don't want to find you sueing me, so I'll say no to everything, whatever the effect on the quality of your life."
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<br>Those trained in Risk Assessment will look at the risk, compare the wider effects and make an informed judgment - but although their numbers are growing, they are few at the moment.
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<br>Two examples: I had a minor (now corrected) heart problem and was told not to fly to the 'States in case of problems. I took a second opinion from a cardiologist who was the Risk Assessment Officer for his hospital, and not only did he say, "You've made the same trip twice recently and it's a small risk anyway, so go ahead, knowing the situation", but he also wrote me an open letter giving this assessment, so my medical insurance was valid. What a difference in attitude!
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<br>The second case is a friend who got DVT on a flight from Australia, where the Bioflow he was wearing may well have saved his life by improving the blood supply through the partly blocked blood vessels. But when he got to hospital, the cardiologist ordered him to take it off, as well as stopping the pain-killers he also used for his arthritis. The man's attitude was, "I'm the only one who can prescribe for you now you're on my ward, and I'll only treat the vascular problems as I'm not qualified to treat arthritis." So my friend had two weeks of bad arthritic pain and no pleading could change the doctor's mind. This is the kind of attitude you need to look out for.
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<br>Now, how does this all relate to pacemakers? The Bioflow CRP magnets direct almost all the power into your wrist, so the outside of the bracelet is only slightly magnetic. So the big risk - of putting the wrist with the bracelet against your pacemaker accidentally - is a far smaller problem than it would be with other makers' bracelets (unless they're puny weak!). In any case, most modern pacemakers are designed to go through an MRI scanner which is a lot more powerful than these magnets, so Bioflows should give no trouble to modern pacemakers.
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<br>So what if you don't want to give up the undoubted benefits of a Bioflow? The obvious answer is to ask your cardiologist, after explaining (and preferably demonstrating) Bioflow's small external field. Risk-assessment trained consultants will be sympathetic and give you a fair hearing.

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Davidinnotts's Response to Janner48's Review

Written on: 19/12/2005

Reply to hedleylester1 about Bioflow fields.
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<br>Thank you for the good idea about using a CRT tube for magnetic field tests.
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<br>I've been using this test for a couple of years:
<br>Take a UK copper coin minted since 1990 (that's most of them). It has 10% of iron in it, so it will be attracted to a magnet. Hold it against the outer face of a Bioflow and pull it off; note the weak magnetic flux. Hold it against the inner face (towards the wrist) and pull it off; note the MUCH greater flux. This test works reliably on every Bioflow I've ever encountered (over 500), of all designs. (The exception was one unit of the 1995 non-water-resistant original type, which was a mass of rust! It was replaced for half price under Ecoflow's Customer Loyalty scheme.) It's possible, though unlikely, that hedleylester1 has a defective unit - I've only ever met one.
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<br>The reason for the result is that the patented Bioflow CRP unit consists of a very high flux neodymium disc magnet set in, but not touching, a steel cup which surrounds the south pole and the rim but leaves the north pole exposed. The north pole faces your wrist and the cup (like a 'keeper') folds the south pole around the powerful north pole into a ring of rather less flux. This leaves very little flux on the back of the unit. The medical trial published by the BMJ in December 2004 and quoted in Reviewcentre review 176272 includes a diagram showing the CRP unit's magnetic field as they tested it. The Bioflow's design allows blood flowing past the CRP unit to be subjected to high and alternating flux and is responsible for the Bioflow being able to mimic the successful electromagnotherapy equipment used in hospitals.
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<br>I noted when I replicated hedleylester1's CRT test on my Compaq 22" monitor that although the two faces of the Bioflow gave colour bending at similar distances, the intensity of the colour patches was much higher for the inner face of the Bioflow. I'd guess that it's the ring south pole that's doing most of the work, rather than the very powerful core north pole which is responsible for the patch intensity. The same south pole ring would also be the strongest influence when the back of the unit is used, as the magnetic field from it extends all round the unit parallel to the face.
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<br>I can't explain hedleylester1's results with staples, except that the conflict of north and south poles on the inner face probably influences the result. Maybe he/she can now work it out, knowing how the CRP unit is constructed. By the way, the distance of about 2 cm is enough to penetrate the wrist to its centre. Blood in vessels near the surface of the wrist would receive a much higher magnetic flux as well as the flux-changing effect of moving past different poles rapidly, and it's this that makes the Bioflow so effective.
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<br>The coin test is a clear indication to any cardiologist of the weak external field of the Bioflow wristbands and it has enabled several pacemaker users who already had a Bioflow to safely continue to receive its therapeutic benefits while not incurring risk from a pacemaker malfunction.

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Hedleylester1's Response to Janner48's Review

Written on: 06/12/2005

I would have to register some slight disagreement with davidinnotts who wrote on 13th Nov 2005,
<br>"The Bioflow CRP magnets direct almost all the power into your wrist, so the outside of the bracelet is only slightly magnetic."
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<br>I have been trialing a Bioflow for a little over a week - wearing it almost continually night and day.
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<br>One easy way of seeing fairly graphically the effects of a magnetic field is to bring the source close to a CRT screen (e.g. a television, but a computer monitor - not an LCD screen - is better because it is easier to engineer a fairly constant white area). Because the electrons which are being attracted from the "electron gun" at the rear of the vacuum tube to the very positively charged screen at the front, in order to form the picture, being electrically charged and in motion, are moved sideways by the magnetic field.
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<br>If I take off my Bioflow and move it with the 'outside' towards my computer screen, it must be between 3.5 - 3.7 cm away from the screen before I can notice any change in the colour of the picture. (On one side of the magnet, the picture begins to go blue, on the other, pink. If you try this out you may find that some ‘permanent’ tints appear to have been caused on the screen. Don’t worry. If you switch the screen off when you go to bed, the tints will disappear by the morning.)
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<br>Offering the Bioflow, 'inside' towards the screen it has to come between 4.2 and 4.5 cm from the screen before I can notice any change.
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<br>Taking the means of these extremes, the difference between the noticeable effect distances is 4.25 - 3.6 = 0.65 or 15%.
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<br>Another easy test of magnetic strength is, how far above a staple does the magnet have to be in order to pick up the staple?
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<br>The 'outside' of my Bioflow has to come between 1.8 and 2.2 cm above my reference staple in order to pick it up, the 'inside', between 2.2 and 2.5 cm. The difference here is 2.35 - 2.0 = 0.35 or, again, around 15%.
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<br>Because magnetic field strength does not fall away linearly with distance we cannot deduce that the field strength right next to the source on the outside is only 15% less than that on the inside, but there is not such a huge difference between the fields generated on the inside and the outside.

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