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★★★★★

“'It' is the story of a monster that takes the form of...”

Written on: 21/10/2006 by dnee18 (1 review written)

Good Points
Very scary, and quite deep for a horror.

Bad Points
Very long.

General Comments
'It' is the story of a monster that takes the form of a clown and preys on children in a small American town called Derry. The main characters are 7 children who are friends, and they take on the clown. I watched the film of Stephen King's book when I was younger, and now reflecting on it, I think that it has more to it than being a simple horror story.



Derry is mostly a quiet and respectable town on the surface, but the story gives the impression that there is something dark and malignant underneath this. This force exposes itself through the bullies at the school, the violence of one of the child's fathers, and the general coldness of other adults. I think that the evil clown is supposed to be a metaphor for this evil force and the underlying evil, darkness and malice in humanity. This is supported by him saying things like "I am your worst nightmare and I am eternal. I am the eater of worlds and of children". Clearly, he is supposed to represent some abstract and eternal destructive force. That he eats children is perhaps metaphorical of this dark force in human nature destroying the innocence of childhood, turning children into adults who suffer from and struggle against depression, anxiety, malice, resentment and fear etc.



It is also interesting that 'It' lives in the sewer beneath the town, as this could represent the way the dark force is deep below the surface of the people in the town. It may even represent the collective unconscious of the town. And the way the monster disguises itself as a clown in order to deceive children may represent how deceptive the respectable surface of the town (and perhaps people in general) is.



The 7 children all have weaknesses individually, but together their bond and friendship is powerful enough to oppose this dark force. In order to destroy the force, it is crucial that they believe that they are capable of doing so and are not afraid of it. I think that this is a powerful message to take into account when dealing with the struggles in our lives.



Perhaps this explanation is a bit far fetched and pretentious, but it does seem to fit together very well, making everything in the story slot into place.